Coronavirus: How far scientists have come up with antidotes

There is no cure, no antidote. Thousands of people have been infected with a new horrible virus.
whos name is COVID-19.

Compared to previous outbreaks, it took scientists several years to develop antibodies to those viruses. However, within a few hours of identifying the virus, various studies were started to stop the spread of the virus.

Chinese authorities quickly revealed the genetic code of the virus.
This allows scientists to easily form an idea of where the virus came from, how to control its spread as it spreads, and how to protect humans from the virus.

Unprecedented speed in making antidotes

The manufacturer of Innovio’s Laboratory Dental Repository in San Diego has used new DNA technology in the face of testimony.
Now the infection of the virus called ‘2019 Encv’ has alarmed the whole world.

Kate Broderick, senior vice president of research at Inovio, said: “After China revealed the DNA sequence of the virus, we entered the lab computer and designed an antidote within three hours.”

“Our antidote uses the DNA sequence of the virus to hit certain parts of the virus in the human body and we believe the body will then be able to build resistance against that virus.”

Innovio says that if the tests performed on the human body at an early stage are successful, the tests will be carried out on a larger scale.

2019-Encv’s timeline

  • December 31, 2019 – China informs the World Health Organization about the unusual outbreak of pneumonia in Wuhan.
  • January 1, 2020 – The seafood and livestock market, which was considered a hotbed of infection, is closed.
  • January 9, 2020 – The World Health Organization reports a new strain of coronavirus.
  • January 10, 2020 – China releases genetic code for new virus
  • January 11, 2020 – Scientists begin work on a vaccine – the first death from the virus has been confirmed.
  • January 13, 2020 – The virus spreads outside China for the first time.

Research by various organizations

The company is working on two more projects to develop an antidote to this new coronavirus.

The University of Queensland is working to develop a ‘molecular clamp’ antidote, which ‘helps the body to quickly develop antidotes against multiple viruses.’

Modern Inc. of Massachusetts, in conjunction with the U.S. National Agency for Allergy and Infectious Diseases, is conducting research to develop antidotes.

The World Health Organization is coordinating global efforts for new antidotes. They said that in addition to the three research projects funded by CP, they are also monitoring the research of other organizations.

Efforts to develop a new coronavirus antidote are in full swing, but research is still in its infancy. Clinical trials to develop a cure for this type of disease are quite time consuming and most effective when the disease is widespread.

There is no guarantee that the antibodies currently being made in laboratories will be able to be used effectively in China.

Anna Maria Henao-Restrepo of the World Health Organization’s Emergency Program Division said: “I have developed a framework through which it will be decided which antidote will be used first.”

“Experts will consider issues such as the acceptable level of safety of the antidote, the appropriate response of the immune system, and the adequate supply of the antidote.”

The World Health Organization will soon confirm which vaccines will be tested on humans.

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